EMDRIA Annual Conference celebrates 25 years of EMDR!

The EMDR International Association Annual Conference will be in Denver, Colorado, on September 18-21, 2014.

EMDRIA strives to provide a Conference dedicated to high quality presentations by trained clinicians and researchers to establish, maintain and promote the highest standards of excellence and integrity in EMDR practice, research and education. With this in mind, participants will be able to identify best practices and emerging research in the treatment of trauma; they will be able to apply advanced clinical skills in the use of trauma treatment modalities; and they will be able to identify ethical dilemmas and appropriate resolutions in educational settings, clinical supervision, and clinical practice.

Please visit the Conference Website here.

Can Childhood Trauma Shorten Your Life?

In an article posted on December 28, 2013, Charlotte Silver connected the findings of the Framingham Heart Study, a long-term cardiovascular study, to the findings of the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study, a long-term study that relates chronic, continuous hyperarousal due to trauma to compromised immune system functioning and multiple adverse health outcomes, which together yield the disturbing affirmative answer to the question Silver posed. Click here to read Silver’s article.

Guarantee All Military Personnel and Veterans Have Informed Choice of Evidence-Based PTSD Treatments

EMDR International Association has started a petition to assure that our military personnel and veterans have an informed choice of evidence-based treatments for post-traumatic stress.  Please go to the link below and sign this petition.  Then help promote this important cause by sending the link to all of your contacts, sharing it on Facebook and Twitter, and/or adding a link on your website.  The White House will take action if we get 100,000 people to sign this by February 6th. You will have to Sign In or Create An Account which is simple to do. Join us and help our military and veterans get the treatment they deserve. Click here to go to the petition.

EMDR Therapy Basic Training Weekend Two in Honolulu in March 2014

Darlene Wade, LCSW, will host EMDR Therapy Basic Training in Honolulu.

We just completed a very successful Weekend One and are now engaged in the required consultation prior to Weekend Two.

Weekend Two will be held on March 14-16, 2014.

The location for Weekend Two will be The Pagoda, 1525 Rycroft Street, Honolulu, Hawaii, 96815, 808-948-8370.

Darlene Wade, LCSW, can be contacted at 808-521-3637 (521-EMDR).

The EMDR Institute Trainer will be Gerald Puk, Ph.D.

The EMDR Institute Weekend Two Training Overview can be found here.

Registration information can be found here.

WHO Guidelines for the Management of Conditions Specifically Related to Stress

© World Health Organization 2013

Posttraumatic stress disorder (recommendations 14–17)

14. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD): psychological interventions – adults
Scoping question 14: For adults with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), do psychological interventions, when compared to treatment as usual, waiting list or no treatment, result in reduction of symptoms, improved functioning/quality of life, presence of disorder or adverse effects?

Recommendation 14
Individual or group cognitive -behavioural therapy (CBT) with a trauma focus, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) or stress management should be considered for adults with PTSD.
Strength of recommendation: standard
Quality of evidence: moderate for individual CBT, EMDR; low for group CBT, stress management

15. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD): psychological interventions – children and adolescents
Scoping question 15: For children and adolescents with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), do psychological interventions, when compared to treatment as usual, waiting list or no treatment, result in a reduction of symptoms, improved functioning/quality of life, presence of disorder or adverse effects?

Recommendation 15
Individual or group cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) with a trauma focus or eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) should be considered for children and adolescents with PTSD.
Strength of recommendation: standard
Quality of evidence: moderate for individual CBT, low for EMDR, very low for group CBT

16. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD): pharmacological interventions – adults
Scoping question 16: For adults with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), do tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) or selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs), when compared to treatment as usual, waiting list or no treatment, result in reduction of symptoms, improved functioning/quality of life, presence of disorder or adverse effects?

Recommendation 16
Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) should not be offered as the first line of treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder in adults.
SSRIs and TCAs should be considered if:
(a) stress management, CBT with a trauma focus and EMDR have failed or are not available;
or
(b) if there is co-morbid moderate–severe depression.
Strength of recommendation: standard
Quality of evidence: low

17. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD): pharmacological interventions – children and adolescents
Scoping question 17: For children and adolescents with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), do antidepressants, when compared to treatment as usual, waiting list or no treatment, result in reduction of symptoms, improved functioning/quality of life, presence of disorder or adverse effects?

Recommendation 17
Antidepressants should not be used to manage PTSD in children and adolescents.
Strength of recommendation: strong
Quality of evidence: very low

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing International Association Response to the Institute of Medicine Report on “Treatment for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Military and Veteran Populations: Initial Assessment”

October 7, 2012

In response to the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) July 2012, publication, Treatment for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Military and Veteran Populations: Initial Assessment, the Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing International Association (EMDRIA) applauds the IOM for its leadership role in calling for the use of evidence-based methods for treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and for advocating stepped-up research on therapies for war stress injuries, with an appropriate recognition of the urgency required.

We do, however, see errors and omissions in the portrayal of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) therapy in the IOM reports; we believe that the misrepresentation of EMDR in the 2008 document unfortunately has been perpetuated in the 2012 Initial Assessment. We are concerned that these misunderstandings will be incorporated as Phase 2 of this study proceeds; thus we are providing you with information with the hope that these inaccuracies can be addressed and corrected. This would positively impact further research on the treatment of PTSD. In the following, we have identified several specific statements in the IOM report that misquote or misrepresent the original EMDR research papers. The inaccuracy of the quotes are serious enough to bias the conclusions of the IOM report and call into question the validity of the document.

In addition, we want to highlight the fact that the original IOM report on PTSD called for randomized clinical trials (RCT) to further evaluate EMDR (IOM, 2008), but this recommendation has not been implemented. It is our hope that our response will encourage the IOM to address this lack of follow through and advocate for randomized clinical trials to test the efficacy of all the evidence-based therapies.

EMDRIA’s complete response can be found here.

For PTSD treatment, EMDR could mean less pain, faster gain

BEHAVIORAL HEALTHCARE

September 21, 2012
By Shannon Brys, Associate Editor

EMDR, which stands for Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing, is a treatment approach that, according to the EMDR Institute’s website, “has been empirically validated in over 24 randomized studies of trauma victims.” In many cases, EMDR is effective in treating PTSD and related problems that arise from experiences and resulting memories so traumatic, life-threatening, or horrifying that they “get stuck,” defying the brain’s normal memory-processing functions and wreaking emotional havoc in the lives of PTSD victims.

“Every experience we’re having is changing the brain in some way. The past remains for the person,” explains Francine Shapiro, PhD, the psychologist who developed EMDR and today serves as executive director of the EMDR Institute (Watsonville, CA). While remembering the past is good when it comes to positive memories—happy events, education and work experiences, life milestones—it can be a negative for traumatic memories.  Sometimes, the memory of traumatic events overwhelms the brain’s routine process of memory consolidation and storage causing the memory—and all of its frightening, horrible, and sensitive emotional triggers—to get “stuck” in the brain.

Shapiro says that people who suffer PTSD or related problems typically struggle to “get past” one of three different types of “stuck” memories. She summarizes the dominant themes of these memories as:

·        “I’m not good enough.”
·        “I’m not safe.”
·        “I’m not in control.”

One common example includes situations like the ongoing recession, when people lose jobs and may experience all of these feelings.  Another all-too-common example involves members of the military who face the constant threat of near-instant death or serious injury.

When a client has a stuck memory, PTSD is often the result. That’s where EMDR comes in.  The treatment helps to process bad or traumatic memories in a more normal way.

The full article may be found here.

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